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5 More Things to Do with Paper Towels

Ever the handy kitchen accessory, paper towels can also help in many surprising ways around the home.

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Our first 5 new uses for paper towels showed that the handy cleaning textile was capable of far more than helping you clean. The low-cost towels can serve as a fat or moisture absorber, or lend a helping hand next time kids are in your kitchen. Plenty of possibilities, and here are 5 more great ones rolled out for you.

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1. Strain Grease from Broth

That pot of chicken broth has been bubbling for hours, and you don’t want to skim off the fat. Instead, use a paper towel to absorb it. Place another pot in the sink. Put a colander (or a sieve) in the new pot and put a paper towel in the colander. Now pour the broth through the towel into the waiting pot. You’ll find that the fat stays in the towel, while the cleaner broth streams through. Of course, be sure to wear cooking mitts or use potholders to avoid burning your hands with the boiling-hot liquid.

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Photo: Shutterstock

2. Keep Frozen Bread from Getting Soggy

If you like to buy bread in bulk from the discount store, this tip will help you freeze and thaw your bread better. Place a paper towel in each bag of bread to be frozen. When you’re ready to eat that forzen loaf, the paper towel absorbs the moisture as the bread thaws.

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3. Clean the Silk Off Fresh Corn

If you hate picking the silk off a freshly husked ear of corn, a paper towel can help. Dampen one and run it across the ear. The towel picks up the silk, and the corn is ready for the boiling pot or the grill.

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4. Make a Place Mat for Kids

Your darling grandchildren are coming over for an extended visit, and though they are adorable, they’re a disaster at mealtime. Paper towels can help you weather the storm. Use a paper towel as a place mat. It will catch spills and crumbs during the meal and makes cleaning up easy.

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5. Make a Beautiful Children’s Butterfly

Use coloured markers to draw a bold design on a paper towel. Then lightly spray water on the towel. It should be damp so that the colours start to run, but do not soak. When the towel is dry, fold it in half, open it up, and then gather it together using the fold line as your guide. Loop a pipe cleaner around the center to make the body of the butterfly and twist it closed. To make antennae, fold another pipe cleaner into a V shape and slip it under the first pipe cleaner at the top of the butterfly.