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13 Best New Books of Fall 2016

There’s no time like fall to curl up in bed with a great book. These 13 titles have been hand-picked by Indigo’s team of book-buying experts. From slow-burning mysteries to captivating memoirs, these are the 13 best books to read this fall.

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Nutshell by Ian McEwan is one of fall's must-read booksPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Nutshell by Ian McEwan

A story of deceit and murder, Nutshell is told by a narrator with a perspective and voice unlike any in recent literature. Love, betrayal, life and death come together in the most unexpected, moving ways in this brilliant new novel from Ian McEwan. Dazzling, funny and audacious, it’s the finest recent work from a true modern master and one of fall 2016’s must-read books.

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Hag-Seed by Margaret AtwoodPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood

Renowned Canadian author Margaret Atwood retells The Tempest, one of Shakespeare’s most unforgettable plays. In Hag-Seed, theatre director Felix has been unceremoniously ousted from his role as artistic director of the Makeshiweg Festival. When he lands a job teaching theatre in a prison, the possibility of revenge presents itself, and his actions will change his cast’s lives forever.

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The Wonder by Emma DonoghuePhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: The Wonder by Emma Donoghue


A village in 1850s Ireland is baffled by a little girl who appears to be thriving after months without food. The story of this “wonder” soon reaches a fever pitch-tourists flock to the family’s cabin, and an international journalist is sent to cover the sensational story. A magnetic novel written with all the spare and propulsive tension that made Room a huge bestseller, The Wonder works on many, many levels.

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A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor TowlesPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles


With his breakout debut novel, Rules of Civility, Amor Towles established himself as a master of sophisticated fiction, bringing 1930s Manhattan to life with a flawless command of style. A Gentleman in Moscow immerses us in another elegantly drawn era with the story of Count Alexander Rostov in the 1920s, shining a light on the most tumultuous years of Russia’s history.

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Wenjack by Joseph BoydenPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Wenjack by Joseph Boyden


Based on a true story, Joseph Boyden’s new book gives us as powerful look into the tragic last moments of Charlie Wenjack, a residential school runaway trying to find his way home. During his journey, Charlie is followed by Manitous, spirits of the forest who comment on his plight, cajoling, taunting, and ultimately offering him comfort on his difficult journey.

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The Best Kind of People by Zoe WhittallPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: The Best Kind of People by Zoe Whittall


What if someone you trusted was accused of the unthinkable? Teacher, husband and father George Woodbury is arrested for sexual impropriety at a prestigious prep school. The story that follows is his family’s attempt to pick up the pieces with George behind bars. Award-winning author Zoe Whittall explores issues of loyalty, truth, and happiness through a family on the brink of collapse.

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Commonwealth by Ann PatchetPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Commonwealth by Ann Patchet


One afternoon in Southern California, Bert Cousins shows up at Franny Keating’s christening party uninvited. Before evening falls, he has kissed Franny’s mother, Beverly-setting in motion the dissolution of their marriages and the joining of two families. Spanning five decades, Commonwealth explores how this encounter reverberates through the lives of everyone involved.

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Waiting for the First Light by Romeo DallairePhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Waiting for the First Light by Roméo Dallaire


In this memoir, Roméo Dallaireretired general, former senator, leading humanitarian and the author of the bestseller Shake Hands with the Devildelves deep into his life since the Rwandan genocide and shares insight into his struggle with post-traumatic stress disorder.

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fall-2016-must-read-books-mad-enchantment-ross-kingPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Mad Enchantment by Ross King


Whether in-person or in photographs, we’ve all seen some of Claude Monet’s legendary water lily paintings. They’re in museums all over the world, yet few know the dramatic story behind their creation. Acclaimed historian Ross King paints the most riveting and humane portrait yet of Claude Monet, arguably one of the most famous artist of the 20th century.

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The Couple Next Door by Shari LapenaPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: The Couple Next Door by Shari Lapena


Anne and Marco Conti have it alla loving relationship, a wonderful home, and a beautiful baby. But one night at a dinner party next door, a terrible crime is committed. Suspicion immediately focuses on the parents. But the truth is much more complicated. What follows is the nerve-racking unraveling of a family that will keep you breathless until the final shocking twist.

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fall-2016-must-read-books-jonathan-safran-foerPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Here I Am by Jonathan Safran Foer


Over the course of three weeks in Washington, D.C., three sons watch their parents’ marriage fall apart. Meanwhile, a massive earthquake devastates the Middle East, sparking a pan-Arab invasion of Israel. With global upheaval in the background and domestic collapse in the foreground, Jonathan Safran Foer asks us: how much of life can a person ultimately bear?

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Fall's Must-Read Books: A Field Guide to LiesPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: A Field Guide to Lies by Daniel J. Levitan


How do we distinguish misinformation, pseudo-facts, distortions and outright lies from reliable information? In A Field Guide to Lies, neuroscientist Daniel J. Levitin outlines the many pitfalls of the information age and provides the means to spot and avoid them.

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Homo Deus BookPhoto: Indigo

Fall’s Must-Read Books: Homo Deus by Noah Yuval Harari


Yuval Noah Harari’s Homo Deus examines the implications of the human condition, from our pursuit of status and happiness to our quest to overcome death by pushing the boundaries of science. This book explores how human beings conquered the world, and above all, asks the fundamental question: Where do we go from here?