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15 Things You Can Clean with a Lint Roller—Besides Clothes

If you're only using lint rollers to clean your clothes, you're missing out on a host of other household benefits. Let's get rolling!

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Get rid of pesky pet hair

Even the best vacuum can’t pick up every pet hair, especially if they creep into smaller spaces. Erin Meyer of Lemons, Lavender, and Laundry recommends using lint rollers to help pick up stray pet hair strands from anywhere in the house that a vacuum can’t reach.

On a cleaning bender? Here are 20 brilliant baking soda hacks you’ll wish you knew sooner.

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Find and toss tiny shards of broken glass


When glass breaks, those small pieces can scatter everywhere and eventually get stepped on. If you’re worried that you missed some small shards of glass after sweeping, grab your handy lint roller to grab any fine particles that remain. Better safe than sorry! Check out more cleaning hacks from professional house cleaners.

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Remove dirt from fabric lampshades


It’s as simple as it sounds. “Simply roll the lint roller all over the shade, and the dust comes right off,” Meyer writes in her blog. If the tape fills up with too much dust too quickly, just change it out, and keep on cleaning. On the other hand, these traditional cleaning tricks don’t work.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides Clotheszentradyi3ell/Shutterstock

Collect stray hair in bathrooms


When excess hair collects on bathroom surfaces, it can make the whole room feel dirty. But you can use a lint roller to clean those hard-to-reach places, such as the back of your bathroom shelves or under the bathtub. Here are more brilliant bathroom cleaning tips.

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Dispose of a bug


Who wants to touch a dead bug? Nobody, that’s who. Enter the handy lint roller. Unlike normal paper or hand towels, trapping the bug with a lint roller will prevent it from flying away or escaping. Best of all, you won’t have to make any physical contact with the icky insect. Here are 10 of the most disgusting house bugs—and how to get rid of them.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesTR Photo/Shutterstock

Clean up spilled glitter and craft supplies


If you have a child who loves crafts, you know all too well the headache of trying to clean up art projects involving glitter, sand, and tiny pieces of paper or ribbon. “One quick swipe with the sticky stuff and the glitter didn’t stand a chance,” writes blogger Jill Nystul of One Good Thing by Jillee.

Check out these genius uses for baby wipes you never thought to try.

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Pick up, old toybepsy/Shutterstock

Quickly clean children’s toys


Lint rollers are an easy way to spruce up a childhood toy when you don’t have time to wash it fully. Another tip: You can also use lint rollers to dust off stuffed animals and to get crumbs out of strollers and car seats in between washes. Psst—did you know you could wash stuffed animals in the washing machine?

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesSabelnikova Olga/Shutterstock

Clean out your purse


All that debris that manages to collect at the bottom of your handbag? Lint roller to the rescue. “A quick swipe (or two) of the lint roller and crumbs and crusties are history!” Nystul writes. You can also use one to clean your gym bag or child’s backpack.

No time (or energy) to clean? You’ll love this easy cleaning shortcuts!

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides Clothesvisualstock/Shutterstock

Tidy up your living room


Pressed for time? Whisk a lint roller over your furniture and carpet for a quick clean-up. “Since they fit underneath your couch and chairs, you don’t need to move your heavy furniture around,” Nystul notes. “Just roll the lint roller underneath and pull out the dust.” Here’s expert advice on how to declutter your home, room by room.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesElvira Koneva/Shutterstock

Dust off some dandruff


No one likes unsightly white flakes on their shoulders. But with a quick sweep from a lint roller, you’re good to go. After you’ve tossed the shirt in the hamper, follow these essential laundry hacks.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides Clothesvvoe/Shutterstock

Reach those corners in your drawers


Cleaning out your drawers takes more than removing junk. To get the dirt in those hard-to-reach crevices, grab a lint roller.Don’t miss these clever cleaning hacks for toothbrushes, either.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesBoJack/Shutterstock

Spruce up your car


Between work, home, and travel, many of us spend a lot of time in our cars. And “every car has those hard-to-reach places where sunglasses and cell phones go missing,” Nystul writes. Those hard-to-reach places like under the seats are another place a lint roller can come in handy. This is how often you should clean the interior of your car (hint: it’s more than you think!).

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesShiv Singh mandrawal/Shutterstock

Sweep up pine needles


Live Christmas trees can look wonderful until they start to dry out. Fortunately, with a lint roller, you can whisk up errant needles and keep your holiday display looking clean and bright.

Here’s a little-known trick to clean your oven without scrubbing.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides Clothesgowithstock/Shutterstock

Clean your drapes


Don’t have time to send your drapes to the dry cleaner? Run a lint roller up and down them for a quick fix. And here are more cleaning tips to make your life easier.

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15 Things You Can Clean With a Lint Roller—Besides ClothesLuisa Leal Photography/Shutterstock

Spiff up your pool table


Too much dirt can on the pool table can affect the game. But vacuums can be too harsh on the table’s delicate fibres. That’s why Nystul recommends you use a lint roller to keep the table clean. Next, find out 20 cleaning tasks you can do in a minute or less.

Originally Published on Reader's Digest