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Remembrance Day Tribute

From personal tributes to National memorials, Canadians across the country remember the fallen. How do you remember?

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Commemorating their Sacrifice

Commemorating their Sacrifice

“When I was 12 years old I was asked to read ‘In Flanders Fields’ at a Remembrance Day assembly in my school. That experience helped me realize the importance of honouring the fallen soldiers who had died for us. Several years ago I asked my husband, Joe, to help me commemorate their sacrifice. Each year since, we set up our humble display as a small but heartfelt thank you to the brave who gave up their lives so we may have the freedom Our Canada enjoys.”

Verna Legg, Calgary

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Recreation Room Display

Recreation Room Display

“I live in a senior residence and every year I decorate our recreation room for November 11. I use photos of Canadian fallen soldiers. Our Canada has been included in my display. The residents really appreciate my effort.”

Thomas Eady, Petrolia, Ont.

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Recreation Room Display

Recreation Room Display

“I live in a senior residence and every year I decorate our recreation room for November 11. I use photos of Canadian fallen soldiers. Our Canada has been included in my display. The residents really appreciate my effort.”

Thomas Eady, Petrolia, Ont.

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Remember Them

Remember Them

“Local history buff David Wondrasek had a vision that some day he’d see each veteran from Churchbridge and the surrounding areas honoured for giving the best years of their lives to their country. In 2008 a committee was formed and June 2011 saw the completion of the Churchbridge Veterans’ Honour Wall with 102 plaques detailing the military record of each veteran. Below the plaques on the main wall is an impressive mural, designed and painted by a local artist, Rita Swanson.”

Gloria Wirth, Churchbridge, Sask.

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Native Canadian soldiers

Native Canadian soldiers

“One of the most magnificent memorials to our fallen troops is along the shore of Vancouver Island. A totem pole (pictured in Bulletin Board in the Oct/Nov issue) was carved by Chief Mungo and raised in 1956 in honour of the Native soldiers who paid the ultimate price in the First and Second World Wars. Since then, Native Canadian soldiers have served and fallen in many conflicts including Korea, United Nations missions and in Afghanistan. These members of the First Nations of Canada have served Queen and country as proud soldiers.”

Robby McRobb, Victoria

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Remembrance Day in Afghanistan

Remembrance Day in Afghanistan

“I spent several months working close to the Canadian Memorial at Kandahar Air Field. I was there during the Remembrance Day ceremony in 2010 and immediately thought about Our Canada. Thank you for devoting space in your magazine to our Canadian heroes.”

Capt. Lance Knox, Sault Ste Marie, Ont.

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Tribute to Afghanistan Fallen

Tribute to Afghanistan Fallen

“I built this tribute in 2010, in memory of the 152 fallen comrades in Afghanistan at the time. I have had two relatives serve in Afghanistan, my brother’s son Joel Chidley and my Aunt’s grandson Wayne Easterbrook Jr. This tribute contains 152 Canadian flags, 3 Union Jacks commemorating World War I, II and the Korean War and one large Canadian flag representing our great country. The plaque that is attached to the tribute is the back cover of the November 2010 issue of More of Our Canada. This tribute was presented at the Remembrance Day ceremonies in Rosseau, Humphrey School, Belvedere Home for the Aged, Foley Cenotaph and was on display for the month of November at the Seguin Township office. Thank you for your attention and your back cover.”

Alex Chidley, Seguin Township, Ont.

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Vimy Ridge Fallen

Vimy Ridge Fallen

This is a picture of Bruce Le Roy Callon of Hamilton, Ont., who died at the battle of Vimy Ridge. Emily Flim of Kendal, Ont., researched this soldier before her trip to France. Find out more by reading her Community Blog post, I Will Remember.