19 Words You Never Realized Are the Same Backwards and Forwards

You’ll never look at these words the same again.

1 / 19
Racecar is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Racecar

Everyone has heard of the famous palindrome example of "racecar," which is spelled the same backwards and forwards. But what if we told you we have 18 more words that you probably never realized are palindromes?

2 / 19
Civic is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Civic

As in relating to a city or a town.

We've rounded up 15 of the hardest words to spell.

3 / 19
Deified is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Deified

This basically means to treat or worship someone or something like a god.

Check out these fascinating facts about the English alphabet!

4 / 19
Level is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Level

Whether this is used as a noun, adjective, or verb, it's pretty self-explanatory.

See if you can pass this quiz of fourth grade spelling words.

5 / 19
Lemel is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Lemel

A lemel is a small shaving of metal like gold and silver. This term is typically used in jewelry stores.

Memorize the best Scrabble words for a competitive edge at your next game night.

6 / 19
Madam is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Madam

If you're looking to address a woman respectfully, this is the word to use.

Would you believe these English words have Gaelic origins?

7 / 19
Minim is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Minim

A minim is the measurement used to describe about one drop of liquid.

Discover why Canadians and Americans spell "colour" differently.

8 / 19
Murdrum is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Murdrum

Murdrum is the crime of killing somebody unknown. This act is very secretive.

According to studies, these are the words women universally hate.

9 / 19
Mom is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Mom

Mother, mommy, madre, mami, mama—you get the idea.

Dive into the words that have different meanings in other languages.

10 / 19
Noon is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Noon

As in the best part of the work/school day: lunchtime!

Steer clear of these compliments that are actually offensive.

11 / 19
Radar is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Radar

Maybe you're talking about electronics, maybe you're talking about your sense of awareness. Regardless, palindromes are definitely on our radar right now.

These are the words that mean the opposite of what you think.

12 / 19
Refer is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Refer

If someone refers you to somebody else, you probably did a great job at something.

Believe it or not—the most complicated English word is only three letters long!

13 / 19
Repaper is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Repaper

Repapering is the act of applying new wallpaper.

Learn about the everyday phrases with surprisingly dark origins.

14 / 19
Rotator is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Rotator

The word "rotator" speaks for itself. Its job is to rotate and/or to rotate something.

Check out this collection of bizarre slang from the 1920s!

15 / 19
Rotavator is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Rotavator

Gardeners should know what this piece of equipment is.

Every Canadian should know these British words and phrases!

16 / 19
Sagas is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Sagas

A saga is basically a fancy name for a long story.

Find out the one word that instantly makes you more trustworthy.

17 / 19
Solos is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Solos

This is the plural of an act that is performed by one person.

Are you guilty of making these common pronunciation mistakes?

18 / 19
Tenet is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Tenet

A tenet is a belief, principle, or opinion.

Could your vocabulary use an update? Start by saying goodbye to these old-fashioned words.

19 / 19
Wow is a palindromePHOTO: TATIANA AYAZO/RD.COM

Wow

As in, "wow" that's a lot of palindromes.

Can't get enough of palindrome words? Don't miss these mind-blowing facts about the English language!

Originally Published on Reader's Digest